7 Powerful Psalms that Teach Us about Love

Love is mentioned 168 times in the English Standard Version of the Book of Psalms. Many of the Psalms were written by King David, a man after God’s own heart, and from whose line Jesus descended. The inspired Word of God teaches us the importance of love throughout the entire Bible, as the story of Jesus unfolds from the beginning to the end of Scripture. John tells us, “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16 ESV). The Psalms are a poetic expression of worship. God’s Word is powerful, and we are made to give glory to Him and proclaim His love.

Here Are 7 Psalms That Teach Us about Love: 

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5 Prayers of Intercession for Your Spouse’s Health

“…I am the LORD, who heals you.” (Exodus 15:26)

Prayer is powerful. When we pray to God on our spouse’s behalf, we acknowledge His sovereignty. Our Creator is in control. He allows suffering, but is not the author of it. God sympathizes with our pain. The author of Hebrews reminds us, “we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.”(Hebrews 4:15)

Marriage allows two people to accomplish more for Christ than we could alone.We can have full confidence God hears us, and is close when we are brokenhearted. His plan for our lives is good, despite the rampant pain and heartache in our world. We can trust and pray for His will for our lives. Because, despite the depravity in the world, His plans are more than we can ask for or imagine. Let us lift all of our worries up to Him, and ask for increased faith and trust in our God. The One True, Triune God.

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When to Tell a Friend How they Hurt You

“My dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, because human anger does not produce the righteousness that God desires.” (James 1:19-20)

Oh, how careful we must be when reacting to hurt. Quick to listen, and slow to speak. The most important thing we can do is choose to wait on our words and prayerfully seek God’s guidance.“This section of the letter,” the NIV Biblical Theology Study Bible explains of James 1:19-20 (above), “focuses on the power of God’s Word and the need for believers to respond to it in obedience.” The human anger James is speaking of is unchecked emotion. Righteous anger, taking a stand against injustice, has a place in God’s Kingdom.

When we scroll through social media or click through different newsreels, we rarely witness quick listening and slow speaking. Passive aggressiveness is posted for all to wonder if it applies to them, and the entitlement to speak our truth holds little regard for who it’s actually hurting. If someone disagrees with an agenda, they are ghosted. Before telling a friend they have hurt us, filter what happened through the following steps.

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What Christians Need to Know about Reformation Day

“I do not set aside the grace of God, for if righteousness could be gained through the law, Christ died for nothing!” Galatians 2:21

Martin Luther is quoted as saying, “The Bible is alive, it speaks to me; it has feet, it runs after me; it has hands, it lays hold of me.” Reform signifies an improvement upon or ridding of oppression/evil by providing a better way. Reformation exposes corruption in an aim to make things better. As Christ-followers, we are in constant reform. “Since Christians are always sinners,” wrote W. Robert Godfrey, “the church will always need reform.” Contrary to what the Catholic Church of Martin Luther’s day proclaimed as truth, Luther poured over Scripture to find there was no penance required or good work needed to earn righteous standing with God. Through Jesus, our faith allows us to confess our sins and repent, becoming more sanctified by the day as we reach closer to the gates of heaven.

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What to Do When Your Child Doesn’t Like Reading the Bible

“Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.”(Ephesians 4:32)

It’s not the end of the world if our children don’t like reading the Bible. Like is a fickle word, and they are growing up in a world that hands them a trophy before they ever step out on the field. The larger and more important question is do they know the Bible? Do they see the word of God lived out in their lives, and know who Jesus, the Living Word of God, is? Children learn from lives rooted in the love of Christ. Jesus is the living Word. They may not like reading the Bible, but if we are following Christ, they are witness to Him, undoubtably. “This basic Christian attitude, which is a result of being forgiven in Christ, along with being kind and compassionate,”NIV Study Bible Notes explain of Ephesians 4:32“brings others what we have received from God.” 

We learn from experience, and hardly any of our experiences are exactly the same! But our God never changes. He is our Rock. We can find hope and direction in the unique relationship we have with Jesus, as individuals and parents. He has purposefully placed our children in our care. God’s faithful and compassionate hand is on each child’s life.

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