The Beautiful Meaning and Story of “Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep”

“In peace I will lie down and sleep, for you alone, LORD, make me dwell in safety.” (Psalm 4:8NIV)

Brimming with influence from Psalm 4, “Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep” is a popular prayer that has been passed down for generations. Although it’s experienced various changes and additions, the prayer reminds us of our humble state in the world. The Lord is the keeper of our souls. God is the Author of every minute we breathe on this earth.

This popular prayer reminds us to “pray continually,” trusting our souls and our lives into the hands of our Good Father as we sleep each night.

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3 Promises for Those FAcing Long Suffering

Long-suffering challenges us to rally patient endurance to get through one day at a time. Our faith is tested when we journey through extended seasons of pain, and our character development is contingent upon our reaction to hard seasons. God’s love is long-suffering towards us. We repetitively make the same mistakes, tripping as we grow into the pattern of following Christ. Yet, our faithful Father in heaven doesn’t waver in love, compassion, forgiveness or mercy. God’s word is faithful to guide us through long-suffering.

What Does the Bible Say about Long-Suffering?

“For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all.” 2 Corinthians 4:17

God’s Word lends a clear picture of how to endure, patiently. Abraham and his wife Sarah were elderly when God promised to make him the father of all nations! “Abraham’s experience reminded me that it’s not unlike God to allow his children to face situations that are hopeless from our perspective,” Sarah Walton wrote for desiringGod, “It’s precisely through these impossible situations that God expands our view of him, exercises our trust in him, and most powerfully displays his glory.”

Believing God for who He is fights our propensity to doubt, worry and despair during times of trial and suffering. Job’s Old Testament account is a well-known example of how to endure trials. His suffering was unfair, immense, and long, yet he never lost faith in God. Job modeled how to come to God with every emotion and depend on the Lord’s strength for survival. David, who underwent many bouts of suffering, wrote, “the righteous person may have troubles, but the LORD delivers them from them all.”

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15 Questions that Will Change Your Prayer Life

Prayer is personal. God hears our voice as distinctly as we call out to Him. 1 John 5:14 says,“This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us.” But more important than what we say, is the frequency in which we pray that matters to God.

Paul explicitly tells us that continual prayer is part of God’s will for us (1 Thessalonians 5:16-18). That’s because continual, committed communication with God is vital for our spiritual growth.

How often do you pray? Is prayer a spiritual discipline you want to grow in? The following fifteen questions touch on four specific aspects of prayer. Use them to take stock of your own prayer life and what you can be doing to strengthen your communication with God.

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A Prayer for Teachers and Educators during the COVID Crisis

(Originally posted April 13, 2020)

Teachers, educators, counselors, and coaches have a huge impact in the lives of the students they work with. With most schools closed for the remainder of the school year, many educators have been getting used to the new normal of online learning. This new learning experience has certainly made many grateful for their teachers. Even kids who tend to complain about the mundane daily routine of school are missing each other and anxiously awaiting being reunited with their students.

Parents and students with zero homeschooling experience are also being thrust into this new upheaval of daily schedules and isolated work from home and schooling environments. Many parents are essential workers, unable to be at home with their children to guide them through lessons and projects. Though many are able to connect through technology and virtual classrooms, there will be an inevitable need to reach out to those who remain disconnected. Not every student has access to a computer, and not every school system is able to provide one for every student.

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It’s OK to be Afraid- 10 Ways to Help Kids through COVID-19

(Originally posted April 2020)

It’s OK to be afraid momentarily, but we don’t have to live scared, “for God gave us a spirit not of fear but of power and love and self-control” (2 Timothy 1:7 ESV). When Peter walked on the water, Jesus reached for him immediately as he began to sink. Immediately. God is not surprised by our fear, nor the current pandemic. Our God goes before us, behind us, and remains with us, always. Jesus, our Savior, knows our fears intimately. People of great faith are wrestling with fear right now. Our children are no different. We don’t have to supply all of the scholarly answers for them. The most important thing Jesus told us to do was to love one another. Parents, caregivers, educators, counselors, and coaches—all those whose lives border and influence a child’s—love is the way through this.

John Piper, in his message “How to Talk to Children About the Coronoavirus,” referenced Matthew 4:24: “They brought [Jesus] the sick, those afflicted with various diseases and pains … and he healed them”(ESV).Love, in Christ, is our comfort. He is steady when our world has been rocked. He is constant, calm, and comforting. In the midst of the storm, when we are sinking, immediately, He is there. “Jesus is more powerful than diseases—every one of them,” Piper teaches.

Here are 10 ways we can help kids cope during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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